Grad Student Forest Cannon Takes Third Place for Poster at AMS Annual Meeting


Geography Associate Professor Leila M. Vespoli de Carvalho (Meteorology and Climate Sciences) recently wrote to say that graduate student “Forest Cannon was notified by the American Meteorological Society (AMS) that his poster presented at the 94th Annual Meeting (2-6 February, Atlanta, Georgia) got 3rd place in the climate variation and change category. The annual AMS meeting is the most prestigious conference in meteorology in the U.S., where hundreds of participants present the state-of-the-art in atmospheric sciences.

Forest, who is a 3rd year graduate student in geography, first year PhD, will receive a certificate and a small check for his outstanding work (good enough for a couple of beers, some cheese, or maybe a good bottle of wine :). The most important thing, however, is that he did a great job and demonstrated the potential of our geography students to advance in many disciplines. Forest has been studying the winter westerly disturbances affecting the Western High Asia Mountains. This project has been supported by NASA and NSF grants.”

According to Forest, “The title of the poster was ‘Multi-Annual Variations in Winter Westerly Disturbance Activity Affecting High Mountain Asia: Large-Scale Circulation and Regional Precipitation.’ The basis of the research is to investigate atmospheric conditions leading to extreme snowfall events in the Karakoram and Himalaya Mountains. Once we identified the mechanisms responsible, we explored how these systems have changed over the past few decades and how they are connected to global modes of atmospheric variability. Through this, we hope to better understand the hydrologic cycle of High Mountain Asia.”

Image 1 for article titled "Grad Student Forest Cannon Takes Third Place for Poster at AMS Annual Meeting"
Forest Cannon is a Geography PhD student researcher, working with UCSB’s Earth Research Institute. He was chosen for the highly selective NASA Earth and Space Science Fellowship – 2013.

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Figure from Forest’s poster showing the track of one Westerly Disturbance, which propagated across central Asia before arriving at the Karakoram. Moisture drawn from the Arabian Sea was orographically lifted upon reaching the Karakoram, resulting in an extreme snowfall event.