UCSB, HED, and Stanford collaborators’ research on prawns and schistosomiasis was the subject of this BBC news article.

Recruiting prawns to fight river parasite

A BBC news article described in extensive detail Professor David Lopez Carr and collaborators’ research in eradicating chronic schistosomiasis using a novel approach: stocking rivers with prawns, a natural predator of the snails that host the parasite.

To view the complete story go to: Recruiting prawns to fight river parasite

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Featured in The UCSB Current: With $1.5 million in NSF funding, Professor David Lopez-Carr and a group of researchers from UCSB and partner institutions will study the effects of a novel way of eradicating schistosomiasis

With $1.5 million in NSF funding, a group of researchers from UCSB and partner institutions will study the effects of a novel way of eradicating schistosomiasis

“A Chronic Disadvantage

The disease has wider implications, according to UCSB geography professor David López-Carr, whose research focuses on the human dimensions of environment change, particularly in the developing areas of the world, as well as rural poverty and development. Those chronically afflicted tend to be the rural poor, people who live and work, bathe and play in the river and surrounding waterways and farms. This is where the infected freshwater snails thrive and continuously shed cercariae, the free-swimming larvae of the parasite that seek out and penetrate human skin. Because the people are constantly exposed to the parasite, and don’t have the means to avoid it in their daily lives or afford treatment, this population is chronically at a health and socioeconomic disadvantage, with poverty and poor health affecting each other in a self-perpetuating cycle.

“It makes you less competent at anything you do,” said López-Carr. “It makes you less effective as a parent or in your work — and that has a huge economic impact on a society.””

To view the complete story go to: A Win-Win-Win-Win

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Karly Miller Featured in UCSB GradPost

Karly Miller, Fulbright Scholar, shows the power of listening

Karly Miller, third year marine science doctoral candidate, is featured in the latest UCSB GradPost spotlight. Her research is on how tourist developments affect the social and ecological importance of fisheries in coastal subsistence-based communities. Learn more about Karly and her work in the link provided above.

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Barbara Quimby Presents at Grad Slam

Barbara Quimby participated in the 6th round of the UCSB Grad Slam on Wednesday, April 6. Her presentation, entitled “Tradition, Equity, and Conservation: Coastal Comanagement in Samoa” provided a three-minute snapshot of her dissertation research project.

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Cascade Tuholske Featured in NASA Earth Observatory Article

Cascade Tuholske Featured in NASA Earth Observatory Article – Roatán, a small island off the coast of Honduras, is seeing a large boom in tourism. PhD student, Cascade Tuholske, touches upon the changes Roatán has seen in the last two decades via Landsat data and what these changes may mean to the island’s ecosystem and people.

Cascade’s research has also been featured in Pacific Standard, a Santa Barbara-based magazine, and can be found at this link: What Happens When a Tiny Island Becomes a Tourist Destination

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Professor Jorge Ruiz Published in Interdisciplinary Science Journal, Nature

Professor Jorge Ruiz Published in Interdisciplinary Science Journal, Nature – Professor Jorge Ruiz published “Biomass Resilience of Neotropical Secondary Forests” in highly cited science journal Nature.

“Land-use change occurs nowhere more rapidly than in the tropics, where the imbalance between deforestation and forest regrowth has large consequences for the global carbon cycle1. However, considerable uncertainty remains about the rate of biomass recovery in secondary forests, and how these rates are influenced by climate, landscape, and prior land use2, 3, 4. Here we analyse aboveground biomass recovery during secondary succession in 45 forest sites and about 1,500 forest plots covering the major environmental gradients in the Neotropics. The studied secondary forests are highly productive and resilient. Aboveground biomass recovery after 20 years was on average 122 megagrams per hectare (Mg ha−1), corresponding to a net carbon uptake of 3.05 Mg C ha−1 yr−1, 11 times the uptake rate of old-growth forests. Aboveground biomass stocks took a median time of 66 years to recover to 90% of old-growth values. Aboveground biomass recovery after 20 years varied 11.3-fold (from 20 to 225 Mg ha−1) across sites, and this recovery increased with water availability (higher local rainfall and lower climatic water deficit). We present a biomass recovery map of Latin America, which illustrates geographical and climatic variation in carbon sequestration potential during forest regrowth. The map will support policies to minimize forest loss in areas where biomass resilience is naturally low (such as seasonally dry forest regions) and promote forest regeneration and restoration in humid tropical lowland areas with high biomass resilience.”

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Aracely Martinez Awarded PhD

Aracely Martinez Awarded PhD – Aracely Martinez, co-advised by Prof. David Lopez-Carr and Prof. Joaquin Eguren Rodriguez, has been awarded her PhD in Sociology from the Universidad Complutense de Madrid. Congratulations!

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David Lopez-Carr Featured on AAAS Member Spotlight

David Lopez-Carr Featured on AAAS Member Spotlight – Learn more about UCSB Geography Professor David Lopez-Carr as he answers “5 Things About Me” in this AAAS Member Spotlight.

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Alumni Marcus Cuellar and Angel Rodriguez pursuing their dreams in Beantown

Alumni Marcus Cuellar and Angel Rodriguez pursuing their dreams in Beantown  – Former LAIS Director, Prof. Lopez-Carr reunited with recent LAIS MA alumni Marcus Cuellar (’14) and Angel Rodriguez (‘14) at a Red Sox-Yankees game at Fenway Park this summer. ”I’m so proud of Marcus and Angel” he comments. Lopez-Carr explained that ”one year after completing the LAIS MA at UCSB, Marcus is a Red Sox point man for international scouting and development and Angel (the A-Rod who did not hit a home run against us during the game) successfully finished his 1st year in Harvard’s PhD program in History of Science. Marcus and Angel are shining reminders of why I cherish being a UCSB professor. Our Boston duo exemplify how our LAIS MA program can serve as a stepping stone towards careers as high in quality as they are diverse in nature.

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Geography Grads Shine at Fellowship Awards Reception

Geography Grads Shine at Fellowship Awards Reception – A reception honoring current recipients of UCSB and extramural fellowships in Engineering; Environmental Science and Management; and Mathematical, Life, and Physical Sciences was held on October 7, and Geography was particularly well-represented. Nineteen of our graduate students were feted at the event.

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