Quincy Lee, Outstanding Geography Student


Quincy Lee, photo by Matt Perko via the UCSB Current

Geography Undergraduate Quincy Lee has been designated as “the guy who would give the Most Interesting Man in the world a run for his money” by the UCSB Current. Quincy exemplifies the meaning of being a geographer, combining his interest in oceanography with writing and story telling in his studies. With the Raab Writing Fellowship he earned, he traveled to Manaus, Brazil to develop a story about local fishermen, conservation practices, and environmental regulations in Mara’a Brazil. He has been active as a local as well, from being the Science and Technology editor at the journalĀ Bottom Line, to being the Blue Water Task Force Manager of the Isla Vista Surfrider Association, where he writes weekly reports of the bacteria levels in local ocean water and plans bi-monthly beach clean-up events. As a student, he worked as an Undergraduate Research Assistant in Education on a collaborative research paper discussing the limits of quantitative views of higher education. During his Semester at Sea, Quincy took part in a travel-writing workshop to learn techniques of spreading information, and was trained on cartographic and geographic ocean navigation. More recently, his work as an intern with Professor Keith Clarke merited a nomination to the Chancellor’s Award for Excellence in Undergraduate Research. Quincy accepted a challenge Professor Clarke made to his Analytical and Computer Cartography class, where he tied a catalog of sites together to create a clearinghouse that linked the search criteria to the first principles of map projection distortion and types. Quincy’s project resulted in a website that is featured on the International Cartographic Association (ICA) Congress in Washington D.C. this year. Quincy Lee graduated this year at the Spring 2017 Commencement, where he walked the UCSB Banner in the Mathematical Life and Physical Sciences graduation ceremony. Congratulations on these many achievements, Quincy! With all your academically-related activities, it’s hard to imagine how you found time to both surf and win an “Outstanding Achievement in the Geography Major”; you have really set the bar high.